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Obama’s chances for reelection

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In a recent party of my relatives and friends ten persons who voted for President Obama were asked if they’d vote for him again if the presidential election were held the following day.

Seven had buyer’s remorse and won’t vote again for Obama. Two would vote for him if he’d be like Bill Clinton in 1995-96 and move to the center. One unabashedly believed Obama could turn around the Bush-caused worst recession since the Great Depression.

The other guests were noncommittal. None of them would say who they’d vote for in 2012. They said elections have always been subject to a sudden game-changer; for instance, if unemployment went up over 10% in the 2012 campaign period, several states would face imminent bankruptcy and the federal government would be on the brink of another financial markets meltdown.

They expected Hillary Clinton would launch a primary challenge against the president. If she wins in Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina, Obama would be under terrific pressure to follow Lyndon Johnson and give up the Democratic Party’s re-nomination for 2012.

Meanwhile, any political development favoring Obama at this time is simply a flickering light at the end of the tunnel. The ruinous policies and programs in his first two years in office would dominate the partisan debate.

Contrary to Ron Brownstein’s Op-Ed piece (Behind Obama’s victories, LA Times 12/24/10), the lame duck Democratic Congress’ legislative victories couldn’t be a sign in any way, shape or form of Obama’s turnaround the liberal media wanted to impress as improving his reelection chances. That’s a mirage in the middle of the desert.

The majority of voters including the independents that left the Democratic Party in droves to vote Republican in the Nov. 2 midterm elections won’t return to Obama. The congressional victories couldn’t have been achieved without moderate Senate Republicans’ support either retiring this year or facing reelection in 2012 on the same issues of the midterm elections.

Susan Collins, Olympia Snowe, Richard Lugar and especially Massachusetts’ Scott Brown have disappointed the Tea Party Movement for being “RINOs” (Republicans in name only). They would likely face conservative primary challengers that Tea Partiers would support even if they returned to the Republican caucus’ conservative game plan in the next two years.

Probably, the Tea Partiers would prefer to pick up vulnerable Democratic seats in other states with really conservative candidates they can rely on rather than supporting RINOs and agonize later, more so when they stray from the party line in case Obama is reelected.

From my perspective Obama should show an undoubtedly decisive move to the center in the next two years like Clinton did to effectively address economic problems and unemployment that may turn from bad to worse during the two years in the run-up to the 2012 elections. Obama has a long way to go to put the economy on the right track at the same time jumping over the hurdles or tire-bursting obstacles on the road to 2012, as follows:

1. Obama’s past associations with Bill Ayers and the Rev. Jeremiah Wright that the liberal media covered up in 2008 would be resuscitated as valid issues of 2012 because of their anti-American values and traditions.

2. George Soros’ financial involvement in Obama’s 2008 campaign, why he could visit the White House easily, and the sources of small $20-$10 contributions that totaled hundreds of millions of dollars suspected to have been a big sum originally and only broken up into small amounts sent by unidentifiable millions of donors via the Internet so no accounting couldn’t be done up to now.

3. The $700-billion Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) is a program of to purchase assets and equity from financial institutions to strengthen and stop the financial markets meltdown, which was signed into law by President George W. Bush on October 3, 2008 under pressure of the Democratic Congress and Wall Street bankers. It was a component of the government’s measures in 2008 to address the sub-prime mortgage crisis caused by Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s indiscriminate lending to homeowners that could not afford repaying their mortgages and caused the housing bubble to burst to begin millions of foreclosures while the homeowners were losing their jobs.

4. The $787 billion stimulus program intended to stop unemployment not to go beyond 8% which has averaged at 9.5% monthly up to now; hence, a subject of controversy whether it’d helped to create, or saved jobs as the latter is claimed by the Obama administration.

Aside above pressing issues, California’s Rep. Darrel Issa has promised to investigate the corruption of the Obama administration. For starters, Issa is expected to probe the following that would put the White House on the defensive up to 2012.

a. White House job offers to Democratic Senate candidates to withdraw in favor of primary challengers in Pennsylvania and Colorado, which is a federal crime.

b. The administration’s slow response to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and the damage caused to the Gulf Coast’s economy.

c. The illegal use of taxpayer funds by ACORN for electioneering in favor of the Democratic Party’s local, state and federal candidates.

d. Elective Democratic officials that got sweetheart mortgage rates from Countrywide Financial Corporation and its former CEO Angelo Mozilo.

e. The appointments of presidential advisers known as “czars” that won’t pass Senate confirmation.

f. The Environmental Pollution Administration’s rules and regulations beyond the enabling congressional authority.

g. Attorney General Eric Holder’s inaction on the New Black Panther Party’s voter intimidation in the 2008 presidential election in Pennsylvania.

In summary, without any dramatic development abroad, say, discernable success in Afghanistan; diplomatic breakthrough that Iran is foregoing nuclear ambition; overthrow of North Korea’s government by democratic activists; and miraculous U.S. economic recovery and job creation to reduce unemployment down to 7.5% Obama’s reelection strategists can only see now a steep hill to climb if he’d have a chance to stay in office.




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